Suburban 1980s home has been painstakingly transformed into a Middle Ages manor

Suburban 1980s home which has been painstakingly transformed into a Middle Ages manor complete with a MOAT, drawbridge and banqueting hall goes on sale for £210,000

Advertisement

A 1980s suburban home painstakingly transformed into a Middle Ages manor complete with a moat and drawbridge is on sale for £210,000.

The three-bedroom property-turned miniature manor house has a mock-Tudor exterior, stained-glass windows and grand fireplaces flanked with candle sconces.

It has been given the name ‘Agincourt‘ after the 1415 battle in which Henry V conquered the French army in the Hundred Years War.

The lounge is reminiscent of a Medieval banqueting hall and most of the rooms feature wood paneling and candelabras, while the master bedroom has a grand four-poster bed.

Outside there is a landscaped garden with a small moat and drawbridge.

The property‘s upstairs windows overlook the Clwydian Hills.

The house on Denbigh Road, Ruthin, Denbighshire, is on sale with .

A 1980s suburban home painstakingly transformed into a Middle Ages manor complete with a moat (pictured) and drawbridge is on sale for £210,000

Yellow walls with wood panels surround the first-floor landing. A brass bust sits on the banister and a chandelier hangs from the ceiling

The front of the house also has wooden panels similar to the interior. Its landscaped garden has a small moat, drawbridge and shed

The property on Denbigh Road, Ruthin, Denbighshire, is on the market for £210,000. A canopy over the oak-paneled front door leads to the central hall

The first floor landing leads to a wood-panelled main bedroom with four poster bed. A window with black curtains can be seen on the staircase

It has been given the name ‘Agincourt‘ after the 1415 battle in which Henry V conquered the French army in the Hundred Years War

The property‘s shed also fits with the Middle Ages theme. It has a black, metal door and a small window with a black window grate

The ground floor is timber-lined and leads onto vibrant rooms include a kitchen and dining room. The green carpet and red and yellow walls mean the property is bursting with colour

The unusual detatched property offers views over the Clwydian Hills and is on sale with Cavendish Residential

The lounge is reminiscent of a Medieval banqueting hall and most of the rooms feature wood panelling and candelabras, while the master bedroom has a grand four-poster

The lounge is reminiscent of a Medieval banqueting hall and would be ideal for entertaining guests. It even comes fit with a bar at the back

A large fireplace fit with candle sconces takes pride of place at the other end of the room. It has a bright red carpet and a red-painted ceiling

The first floor‘s highlight is the wood-panelled main bedroom with four poster bed. A coat of arms can be seen on the wall

Another one of the property‘s three bedrooms features peach-coloured walls and a red carpet. The wall is lined with wood

Receive News & Ratings Via Email - Enter your email address below to receive a concise daily summary of the latest news and analysts' ratings with MarketBeat.com's FREE daily email newsletter.

The final bedroom features ornate wallpaper with a red carpet and matching curtains. The radiator is also painted a lighter shade of red

WHAT WAS AGINCOURT?

The Battle of Agincourt occurred on October 25, 1415. 

Newly crowned as King of England, Henry V, then 27, ventured across the channel to France where the English crown owned land. 

The warrior ruler excited the medieval parliament of the day and funds flooded in to finance a war effort to tackle ‘the old enemy‘.

Initially, the invasion was met with disaster when thousands of troops died of dysentery at the siege of Harfleur. 

He turned his forces around and marched on Calais, before being blocked by a French army at Arras. 

It is thought by some that an army several times the size of Henry‘s was facing the English. 

Henry was presented with an option to avoid what looked like a slaughter of thousands of Englishmen — give up his lands in France and there will be no fighting. 

This, Henry knew, would undermine his new found authority and infuriate those across the channel in England and was not an option. 

Despite overwhelming odds, the Englishmen fought the French. 

The French were systematically picked off by the longbows, with Henry refusing to give in to demands to give up his french lands in exchange for no fighting.

Geographical restraints of the battlefield meant that he French advanced into a barrage of arrows, with horses and men losing their lives. 

The swelling mass of cadavers made it impossible for reinforcements to advance the front line, and with no mercy given shown, no quarter given, the French  nobility were massacred on their own turf by a foreign ruler. 

The battle was said to have been fought ‘for England, harry and St George‘ and ranks atop any list of English military victories, alongside iconic moments such as the battles of Waterloo and Trafalgar. 

Agincourt‘s impact was profound.

The French aligned with the English, Henry V was recognised as king of France as well as England and he received a hero‘s welcome upon return home. 

Charles the Mad acknowledged him as heir, he wed his daughter, and five years later he entered Paris after the French capitulated and signed the Treaty of Troyes.

Despite bringing England back to the heights of the bygone eras of Henry II and Edward II he died only seven years after Agincourt from Dysentry in August 1422.

The very same year, Charles the Mad, the french king, died, leaving one of the most territoriality powerful empires in Europe in the hands of a child. 

His claim to the French throne was undermined by the presence of the Dauphin, the kind of Charles the Mad. 

War would yet again commence between the two nations. 

 

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*